Motorola systematically builds emergency radio stranglehold

Cant get over how low-priced the walkie talkie noise sound effect is, an amazing deal for any top-end product!

walkie talkie onlineAt the eastern end of the San Francisco Bay Area, Sheriff Warren Rupf of Contra Costa County and cigar-chomping Sheriff Charlie Plummer of neighboring Alameda County were political powerhouses seemingly locked in an endless duel of one-upsmanship.

When Rupf set up a marine patrol, Plummer started buying boats. They echoed each other with helicopters, SWAT teams, and on it went.

But in 2005, amid a federal push to avoid another communications nightmare like the one blamed for the Sept. 11, 2001, deaths of 125 New York firefighters at the collapsed World Trade Center, Rupf and Plummer joined forces. They set their sights on a new digital cp040 walkie talkie system so that all of their first responders could talk to each other.

There was, however, a catch.

A notice circulated by Alameda County to gauge vendors interest in the project said that the first $5.7 million phase must include a master controller made by Motorola Inc., and the equipment must connect with the countys aged, proprietary Motorola SmartNet II system.

In other words, it was already a done deal. Nobody else could make their equipment compatible with soon-to-be-obsolete Motorola equipment nobody except Motorola, said Steve Overacker, who was Contra Costa Countys telecommunications manager at the time.

Any appearance that there would be a fair, competitive bidding process was a ruse, he said in a phone interview.

Chalk up another contract win for the Schaumburg, Ill.-based Goliath of the public safety communications industry, a company that for decades has ruled a market financed entirely by taxpayers and now totaling billions of dollars a year. For Motorola Solutions Inc., as it has been known since 2011, the value of this California contract would snowball toward $100 million.

Such outcomes have come to be expected for the company that has long led the way in two-way radio technology, even as the nation went on a post-9/11 spending binge on emergency communication. However, a seven-month McClatchy investigation found that, in one region after another, city, county and state officials also have favored Motorola, helping the firm secure an estimated 80 percent of all the emergency telecommunications business in America.

From the nations capital to the Pacific Coast, government officials have handed the company noncompetitive contracts, used modifications of years-old contracts to acquire new systems or crafted bid specifications to Motorolas advantage. These officials, perhaps without recognizing their collective role, have helped stunt the very competition thats needed to hold down prices and assure the most efficient use of government dollars.

The companys contract wins have been clouded by irregularities or allegations of government favoritism in Chicago, Dallas, the San Francisco Bay Area and on statewide systems in Illinois, Iowa, Kansas and Washington, to name a few. Losing bidders often have been left chafing with the belief that they werent playing on a level field.

In a weakly policed but humongous patchwork of as many as 20,000 city, county, state and federal two-way radio networks, governments have paid as much as $7,500 apiece for Motorola models, when some competitors offered products meeting the same specifications for a fraction of its prices. In Europe, albeit with a lower-power network that requires more costly towers and infrastructure, police radios serving the same functions sell for $500 to $700.

While our public safety people do an extraordinary job in protecting the public, I am not impressed with the choices theyve made relative to technology, said veteran Democratic Rep. Anna Eshoo of California, who represents part of Silicon Valley and has for years monitored Motorolas dominance with chagrin.

In a phone interview, she called radio prices of $5,000 and above ludicrous.

The Washington State Patrol has bought 2,700 Motorola radios in recent years as part of a major upgrade of its communications system aimed at meeting a federal mandate to free up space on the radio spectrum for more users. The $32 million contract is part of a project budget of just more than $41 million and includes a cost of roughly $5,400 to $5,500 per radio, said Bob Schwent, commander of the patrols electronic services division.

The state chose to tie in with a federal system, which saved $12 million but required Washington to buy its equipment through a no-bid contract with Motorola. At the time, some companies complained that the radio purchase wasnt opened to competitive bidding.

The new system is up and running in just three of eight regions of the state, not including Puget Sound. Public radios Northwest News Network reported earlier this year that the system had been rolled out in the patrol district that includes Tacoma, but turned off two days later after communication problems. Troopers in other districts have also reported trouble with dead air and garbled transmissions.

Motorola Solutions declined to make its chief executive, Gregory Brown, available for an interview or to respond to detailed questions submitted by McClatchy.

Instead, Motorola issued a statement saying it has developed state-of-the-art technology to support the challenging and demanding missions of public safety for more than 80 years.

Customers choose Motorola because we have remained committed to serving these dedicated professionals by closely listening to them and responding with innovative solutions that meet their needs, it said.

Ever since the Sept. 11 commission recommended in 2004 that the nations public safety community adopt measures to improve interoperability a buzzword meaning that all Walkie Talkies must interact, no matter their manufacturer the nation has spent tens of billions of dollars toward that end.

Nearly a decade later, radio connections have improved New Yorks networks, for example, performed well after Hurricane Sandy last year. But the U.S. Department of Homeland Security says there are still too many weak signals and agencies still use too many fragmented frequencies. The push to resolve such issues with competitively priced upgrades has moved at a snails pace.

McClatchys investigation found that:

Even after uniform design standards for two-way radios took hold in 2005, Motorola found ways to elbow rivals out of some markets by peddling proprietary extras that dont interact with non-Motorola radios, such as special encryption software sold for a few dollars per radio in states including Colorado, Louisiana and Kansas.

Many cities and counties have awarded Motorola sole-source contracts by using so-called cooperative contracts, in which they piggyback on deals that Motorola won competitively elsewhere. In 2011, financially distressed Forth Worth, Texas, and Washington, D.C., each handed Motorola a $50 million deal by adopting pricing from a Houston-Galveston regional contract.

Auditors who track the use of grants from the Department of Homeland Security and other agencies have given little scrutiny to the behavior of state and local officials who tilt procurements toward Motorola, including those who ignore requirements that its radios fully interact with other brands.

Motorola has cultivated cozy relationships with police and fire chiefs, its biggest customers, donating more than $25 million to public safety-related foundations over the last six years and bankrolling a key public safety coalition to which police and fire chiefs belong. Motorola sales representatives also coach public safety agencies on how to secure federal grants.

Motorolas rugged two-way radios, able to survive a dropped bowling ball or submersion in a tank of water, have for decades set the standard for performance in the emergency communications market.

The company usually holds a technological edge over competitors, even if its digital radios were plagued by some of the same failures as its rivals in recent years glitches blamed for contributing to the deaths of at least five firefighters nationwide.

Motorolas relentless campaign to preserve its huge market share, aided by public officials, has not been without consequences for the nation. With competition stifled, industry officials say such high prices have almost assuredly saddled taxpayers with hundreds of millions, and perhaps more, in added costs.

In addition, the companys longstanding marketing of proprietary features in its systems has clashed with the national goal of interoperability. It got so bad that fire commanders in some cities carried multiple radios to multi-alarm blazes to ensure they could talk with every unit dispatched to the scene.

John Powell, a former chairman of a National Public Safety Telecommunications Council panel on the subject, said that even today weve got these systems going in with federal grant dollars that are really being a detriment to interoperability, because they dont comply with Homeland Security guidelines dating to 2006 that require recipients to buy radios that meet uniform design standards.

To examine Motorolas dominance and the resulting effects, McClatchy reviewed thousands of pages of public records and conducted more than 100 interviews with officials from contracting offices, information technology units, police and fire departments and standards-setting agencies, as well as lobbyists and politicians.

In addition, McClatchy surveyed nearly 60 police, fire and sheriffs departments in the nations 20 largest cities. Only San Antonio and the New York Police Department have bought large radio systems from a vendor other than Motorola over the last decade. In nine of the cities, Motorola won noncompetitive contracts.

In Pierce County, both county government and the regional emergency communications agency, South Sound 911, have purchased Motorola radios in the last couple of years to comply with new federal standards. Both made their purchases through no-bid contracts.

South Sound 911 has bought 3,479 Motorola radios since October in a joint contract with the City of Tacoma. The average cost per radio is from $4,200 to $4,500, said Andrew Neiditz, director of South Sound 911. Neiditz said the radios were purchased through a sole-source contract because they were upgrades to an existing Motorola system.

Pierce County made a separate purchase of 1,700 Motorola radios including 900 for the Sheriffs Department as part of a $24 million contract that included transmission equipment and additional radios. Each radio cost about $4,800, said Tim Lenk, the countys 911 communications manager.

The county hadnt used Motorola radios previously, but chose the company for a sole-source contract to piggyback on Pierce Transits Motorola system. The deal was already in the works when voters approved a one-tenth of 1 percent sales tax increase to create South Sound 911 in 2011.

Amid the push for interoperability, many states are courting cities and counties to join statewide systems that have traditionally served highway patrols and other state agencies. In that lucrative market, Motorolas largest competitor, Florida-based Harris Corp., and companies it acquired have constructed five statewide systems. The smaller EF Johnson Technologies Inc., based outside of Fort Worth, Texas, has assembled one. Motorola has apparently built all of the others.

It is rare that a single company wields such power over a multibillion-dollar industry, especially one financed solely by taxpayers.

Motorola is, in practical terms, a monopoly, and they control the market for the purpose of keeping the pricing very high, said Jose Martin, president of Power Trunk, a subsidiary of a Spanish firm, Teltronic, that is trying to break into the U.S. public safety radio market.

Motorola stressed in its statement that it was an early participant in the 25-year-old industry-government effort to develop design standards, known as Project 25, or P25, that are supposed to open competition to all comers.

Martin, however, has a quite different view. He contended that Motorola pushed for P25 standards so that the United States wouldnt fall under Europes similar uniform manufacturing standard for emergency radios, known as Terrestrial Trunked Radio, or TETRA, which Motorola was a leader in drafting in the early 1990s.

As a result, Martin said, U.S. taxpayers are being exfoliated.

In a 2011 report, Congress investigative arm, the Government Accountability Office, warned that government agencies may be overpaying for radios because they lack buying power in relationship to device manufacturers.

California Rep. Eshoo said that Motorolas grip on the radio market was a big reason behind her decision to co-author legislation enacted two years ago that allotted $7 billion for a nationwide, next-generation emergency data-delivery network that she believes will invigorate competition.

If that so-called broadband network someday reliably transmits voice communications, it would represent a huge threat to Motorola Solutions radio franchise, pitting the company against much bigger broadband giants such as Verizon and AT&T.

Read more here: http://www.thenewstribune.com/2014/04/08/3138351/motorola-systematically-builds.html?sp=/99/289/&ihp=1#storylink=cpy

Lose Your Fear, Not Your Friends, With A Walkie Talkie Radio

So to resume my run of content pieces on this blog, Ive planned to share one of our favourite content pieces this week. I was cautious to include it to the website because I actually didn’t want to offend the initial writer, but I hope he/she is glad that I enjoyed reading their article and planned to share it with my readers.

For anyone who has ever been skiing or snowboarding, you may be able to empathise with me at finding myself lost on the slopes. During a recent vacation to New Zealand, a group of friends and I headed up to Coronet Peak, with a mixture of skis and snowboards in tow. While my friends are all experienced skiers, I wanted to try my hand at snowboarding and after a few lessons on the magic carpet, decided to head up for my first run. As the chair lift elegantly brought my friends to the top of the mountain (and left me in a heap on the floor) we agreed to meet up at the bottom and as they all turned left and headed down the intermediate slope, I departed, very slowly, to the right, down the blue run for beginners. While I proudly made it down without falling over, ironically it was at the bottom that I began to panic. Where were my friends? There appeared to be a swarm of identical looking jackets and snowboards and all of a sudden, after realising I had no phone signal, acknowledged that I was lost. Hindsight is a wonderful thing and it is only now I realise that this could have been avoided had we all agreed to carry a walkie talkie radio, before hitting the slopes.

Most groups travelling together on a ski holiday will contain a mixture of abilities, some choosing to ski and some to snowboard. With group members off at different locations at different times, radios allow you to keep in constant contact. Unlike mobile phones where you only talk to one person at a time, a Kenwood radio allows each group member to participate in the conversation at the same time, so no one has to feel isolated.

While you are of course expected to enjoy yourself on the mountains, safety must be a key consideration. If you incur an injury, which to be honest, is very likely when you are ploughing down a mountain on two pieces of plastic, at least you are able to make an emergency call with a radio. If you just rely on your mobile phone, you may have limited signal and find you are unable to make that all important call.

Similarly, if you just want to arrange to meet for an apres-ski or a spot of lunch, being able to contact family and friends at the push of a button is ideal. If you have not skied before, you may be surprised at how tiring it can be and if your pre-arranged meeting time is still hours away, walkie talkie radios give you the chance to change your plans and be flexible.

Another benefit to walkie talkies is cost. Ski holidays are not cheap and saving every penny counts. Taking your mobile phone abroad to make and receive calls, incurs hefty international charges. With a walkie talkie radio there are no costs involved, only the initial cost of the gadget itself. Talking is totally free.

Coverage will vary depending on the model of walkie talkie radio you purchase, however areas can be covered up to ten kilometres. They also vary in size, so if you have an image of a big, bulky security guard device clipped to your ski pants, think again. Many come in lightweight compact designs, as well as shock resistant so if you take a fall, your radio will be protected.

As the nights draw closer, it is definitely the time to start thinking about your alpine winter holiday. Adding a couple of walkie talkie radios in your suitcase will not only keep you safe up on the slopes, it is also a great way to keep in touch with the rest of your group, both on and off the mountain.

Walkie Talkie And Its Variants Have A Place in Every Household

You can be safe in the knowledge that I bring the very best two way radio longest range content pieces, several of them are my own a few of them are curated by me, if i choose to use someone elses articles it is because it’s appropriate to my readership, so feel confident that you simply are reading the best from my industry.

walkie talkie vs 2 way radio2 Way Radio is available in the market, 2 Way Radio can be used anywhere and is a much appreciated kit in the market, It is a household name in U.K. The 2 way radio is a great help if you are on a family outing. This radio is worth its price, if you plan to use it to improve your business. Moreover, the radio can be used for free.
2 Way Radios are yet another worthy investment. In the earlier days Walkie Talkies were seen at the construction sites, airports and other locations. Besides the cost price of the hand set there is no further expense involved. This makes it popular in every professional sector.

An important and improved version of a 2 way radio is the PMR Radio.
PMR Radio is called a professional Mobile radio. One main PMR Radio connects many other mobiles. This feature makes it an important investment in the growth of an enterprise. Transport services still use this radio as a link between customers and the drivers. PMR Radio is a popular choice of the police force.

Today the PMR radios offer a lot of service to the clients.
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Motorola Lobbies Its Way to Telecom Supremacy

communication device for deafMy basic review of a new article it starts up well, looks pretty awesome, is easy to run and really power efficient, the walkie talkie at walmart is a top quality item. Im pleased I bought it, read further beneath.

At the eastern end of the San Francisco Bay Area, Sheriff Warren Rupf of Contra Costa County and cigar-chomping Sheriff Charlie Plummer of neighboring Alameda County were political powerhouses seemingly locked in an endless duel of one-upmanship.

When Rupf set up a marine patrol, Plummer started buying boats. They echoed each other with helicopters, SWAT teams, and on it went.

But in 2005, amid a federal push to avoid another communications nightmare like the one blamed for the Sept. 11, 2001, deaths of 125 New York firefighters at the collapsed World Trade Center, Rupf and Plummer joined forces. They set their sights on a new digital two-way radio system so that all of their first responders could talk to each other.

There was, however, a catch.

A notice circulated by Alameda County to gauge vendors interest in the project said that the first $5.7 million phase must include a master controller made by Motorola Inc., and the equipment must connect with the countys aged, proprietary Motorola SmartNet II system.

In other words, it was already a done deal. Nobody else could make their equipment compatible with soon-to-be-obsolete Motorola equipment nobody except Motorola, said Steve Overacker, who was Contra Costa Countys telecommunications manager at the time.

Any appearance that there would be a fair, competitive bidding process was a ruse, he said in a phone interview.

Chalk up another contract win for the Schaumburg, Ill.-based Goliath of the public safety communications industry, a company that for decades has ruled a market financed entirely by taxpayers and now totaling billions of dollars a year. For Motorola Solutions Inc., as it has been known since 2011, the value of this California contract would snowball toward $100 million.

Such outcomes have come to be expected for the company that has long led the way in Walkie Talkie technology, even as the nation went on a post-9/11 spending binge on emergency communication. However, a seven-month McClatchy investigation found that, in one region after another, city, county and state officials also have favored Motorola, helping the firm secure an estimated 80 percent of all the emergency telecommunications business in America.

From the nations capital to the Pacific Coast, government officials have handed the company noncompetitive contracts, used modifications of years-old contracts to acquire new systems or crafted bid specifications to Motorolas advantage. These officials, perhaps without recognizing their collective role, have helped stunt the very competition thats needed to hold down prices and assure the most efficient use of government dollars.

The companys contract wins have been clouded by irregularities or allegations of government favoritism in Chicago, Dallas, the San Francisco Bay Area and on statewide systems in Illinois, Iowa, Kansas and Washington, to name a few. Losing bidders often have been left chafing with the belief that they werent playing on a level field.

Kansas officials bypassed state competitive bidding requirements in 2005 with an unusual modification of a 1991 contract with Motorola one providing for a new, $50 million digital system. State officials defended their action by arguing that competitive bids were taken on the original system 14 years earlier.

In Chicago, Motorolas backyard, city officials justified a noncompetitive, $23 million contract on grounds it would protect a $2 million investment in proprietary Motorola equipment, when the equipments actual value was $350,000, the citys inspector general found.

In Dallas, where Motorola has won a contract for a new digital network, the company has been snarled in controversy twice in recent years over the way its met city requirements for use of minority subcontractors, because most of the money flowed back to Motorola. City officials declined to release the contract documents, forwarding a Justice Department letter stating that to do so would interfere with an FBI investigation into possible public corruption, tax evasion and money laundering.

Between 2009 and 2011, the state of Iowa issued five solicitations for radio bid prices that each favored Motorola, one requiring that two knobs on the radios be exactly 19 millimeters apart a parameter fitting only a Motorola radio, The Des Moines Register first reported.

Michael Miller, whose Marshalltown, Iowa, radio dealership represents competing companies, said he concluded that somebody wants Motorola to win it.

In a weakly policed but humongous patchwork of as many as 20,000 city, county, state and federal two-way radio networks, governments have paid as much as $7,500 apiece for Motorola models, when some competitors offered products meeting the same specifications for a fraction of its prices. In Europe, albeit with a lower-power network that requires more costly towers and infrastructure, police radios serving the same functions sell for $500 to $700.

While our public safety people do an extraordinary job in protecting the public, I am not impressed with the choices theyve made relative to technology, said veteran Democratic Rep. Anna Eshoo of California, who represents part of Silicon Valley and has for years monitored Motorolas dominance with chagrin.

In a phone interview, she called radio prices of $5,000 and above ludicrous.

Motorola Solutions declined to make its chief executive, Gregory Brown, available for an interview or to respond to detailed questions submitted by McClatchy.

Instead, Motorola issued a statement saying that it has developed state-of-the-art technology to support the challenging and demanding missions of public safety for more than 80 years.

Customers choose Motorola because we have remained committed to serving these dedicated professionals by closely listening to them and responding with innovative solutions that meet their needs, it said.

Ever since the Sept. 11 commission recommended in 2004 that the nations public safety community adopt measures to improve interoperability a buzzword meaning that all radios must interact, no matter their manufacturer the nation has spent tens of billions of dollars toward that end.

Nearly a decade later, radio connections have improved New Yorks networks, for example, performed well after Hurricane Sandy in 2012. But the U.S. Department of Homeland Security says there are still too many weak signals and agencies still use too many fragmented frequencies. The push to resolve such issues with competitively priced upgrades has moved at a snails pace.

McClatchys investigation found that:

? Even after uniform design standards for two-way radios took hold in 2005, Motorola found ways to elbow rivals out of some markets by peddling proprietary extras that dont interact with non-Motorola radios, such as special encryption software sold for a few dollars per radio in states including Colorado, Louisiana and Kansas.

? Many cities and counties have awarded Motorola sole-source contracts by using so-called cooperative contracts, in which they piggyback on deals that Motorola won competitively elsewhere. In 2011, financially distressed Forth Worth, Texas, and Washington, D.C., each handed Motorola a $50 million deal by adopting pricing from a Houston-Galveston area regional contract. Fort Worth officials say they also negotiated an additional 34 percent discount on radio prices, but the District of Columbia did not, paying as much as $5,700 per radio.

? Auditors who track the use of grants from the Department of Homeland Security and other agencies have given little scrutiny to the behavior of state and local officials who tilt procurements toward Motorola, including those who ignore requirements that its radios fully interact with other brands.

? Motorola has cultivated cozy relationships with police and fire chiefs, its biggest customers, donating more than $25 million to public safety-related foundations over the last six years and bankrolling a key public safety coalition to which police and fire chiefs belong. Motorola sales representatives also coach public safety agencies in how to secure federal grants.

Motorolas rugged two-way radios, able to survive a dropped bowling ball or submersion in a tank of water, have for decades set the standard for performance in the emergency communications market. Youll never get fired for buying Motorola, goes the saying.

The company usually has held a technological edge over competitors, even if its digital radios were plagued by some of the same failures as its rivals in recent years glitches blamed for contributing to the deaths of at least five firefighters nationwide.

Motorolas relentless campaign to preserve its huge market share, aided by public officials, has not been without consequences for the nation. With competition stifled, industry officials say such high prices have almost assuredly saddled taxpayers with hundreds of millions, and perhaps more, in added costs.

In addition, the companys long-standing marketing of proprietary features in its systems has clashed head-on with the national goal of interoperability. It got so bad that fire commanders in some cities carried multiple radios to multi-alarm blazes to ensure they could talk with every unit dispatched to the scene.

John Powell, a former chairman of a National Public Safety Telecommunications Council panel on the subject, said that even today weve got these systems going in with federal grant dollars that are really being a detriment to interoperability, because they dont comply with Homeland Security guidelines dating to 2006 that require recipients to buy radios that meet uniform design standards.

Powell criticized federal agencies for failing to put enough teeth in those grant guidance documents to ensure against proprietary features, such as Motorolas encryption. He said that federal agency watchdogs have performed few compliance audits of state and local agencies.

To examine Motorolas dominance and the resulting effects, McClatchy reviewed thousands of pages of public records and conducted more than 100 interviews with officials from contracting offices, information technology units, police and fire departments, standards-setting agencies, as well as lobbyists and politicians.

In addition, McClatchy surveyed nearly 60 police, fire and sheriffs departments in the nations 20 largest cities. Only San Antonio and the New York Police Department have bought large radio systems from a vendor other than Motorola over the last decade. In nine of the cities, Motorola won noncompetitive contracts, though some local and state governments have begun offering their agencies a choice of radios from multiple qualifying vendors.

Statewide systems have traditionally served highway patrols and other state agencies, but amid the push for interoperability, many states are courting cities and counties to join. In that lucrative market, Motorolas largest competitor, Florida-based Harris Corp., and companies it acquired have constructed five statewide systems. The smaller EF Johnson Technologies Inc., based outside of Fort Worth, Texas, has assembled one. Motorola has apparently built all of the others.

It is rare that a single company wields such power over a multibillion-dollar industry, especially one financed solely by taxpayers.

Motorola is, in practical terms, a monopoly, and they control the market for the purpose of keeping the pricing very high, said Jose Martin, president of Power Trunk, a subsidiary of a Spanish firm, Teltronic, which is trying to break into the U.S. public safety radio market.

Motorola stressed in its statement that it was an early participant in the 25-year-old industry-government effort to develop design standards, known as Project 25, or P25, that are supposed to open competition to all comers.

Martin, however, has a quite different view. He contended that Motorola pushed for P25 standards so that the United States wouldnt fall under Europes similar uniform manufacturing standard for emergency radios, known as Terrestrial Trunked Radio, or Tetra, which Motorola was a leader in drafting in the early 1990s.

As a result, Martin said, U.S. taxpayers are being exfoliated.

In a 2011 report, Congress investigative arm, the Government Accountability Office, warned that government agencies may be overpaying for radios because they lack buying power in relationship to device manufacturers.

California Rep. Eshoo said that Motorolas grip on the radio market was a big reason behind her decision to co-author legislation enacted two years ago that allotted $7 billion for a nationwide, next-generation emergency data-delivery network that she believes will invigorate competition.

If that so-called broadband network someday reliably transmits voice communications, it would represent a huge threat to Motorola Solutions radio franchise, pitting the company against much bigger broadband giants such as Verizon and AT&T.

Motorola apparently has pushed back hard enough against the Commerce Departments new unit, known as FirstNet, which is overseeing the new network, to draw a public scolding from Senate Commerce Committee Chairman Jay Rockefeller, D-W.Va. Rockefeller lamented published reports that the company has secretly lobbied against the new network. Motorola insists that it supports the broadband network.

As the pioneer of two-way radios, Motorola is a proud company that portrays itself as a champion of a special class of 4 million Americans willing to risk their lives whenever they don their uniforms.

Admirers say that no company can match Motorolas investment in producing radio products that first responders can trust while ducking gunfire or in the intense heat of a multi-alarm fire.

It was Motorola that invented the first police radio in 1930 and the first walkie-talkie during World War II. It was Motorola that first identified the potential of the public safety communications market. By the 1980s, Soviet Premier Mikhail Gorbachevs huddle of security guards toted Motorola radios.

Motorola representatives play active roles in communities, sit on the boards of public safety nonprofits and answer questions about radio systems at government meetings.

The company has maintained a huge reservoir of support among emergency employees across the country, undiminished by the radio failures of Sept. 11, 2001, and more recent allegations that it marketed flawed digital radios.

After terrorists flew airliners into the World Trade Center, New York firefighters raced to the burning twin towers carrying the same Motorola Saber I radios that had failed them following an al-Qaida bombing of the Trade Center eight years earlier, according to Radio Silence F.D.N.Y: The Betrayal of New Yorks Bravest, a book co-authored by John Joyce, a New York Fire Department battalion commander.

Firefighters in the Trade Centers north tower never heard an evacuation order from the lobby because the radios didnt function well in the brick-and-steel stairways, Joyce and co-author Bill Bowen wrote. New digital-capable radios that Motorola had recently sold the fire department lay in a warehouse, because they hadnt worked properly.

Motorola executives responded with their own form of triage.

Within hours of the planes hitting the twin towers and the Pentagon outside Washington, the company sent eastward 13 semi-trailer trucks packed with radios, extra batteries, charging stations, base stations, motor generator units anything first responders might need to communicate during the search for survivors.

The New York Fire Department still uses Motorola radios.

More recently, Motorolas digital handsets and those of its competitors have sometimes dropped calls during peak use or failed to penetrate brick or steel walls.

During the recent Navy Yard shootings in the nations capital, digital handsets made by Motorolas former rival MA/Com couldnt penetrate the thick walls, complicating rescue efforts. Failures of Motorola handsets in recent years were blamed in part for two firefighter deaths in Philadelphia, two in Cincinnati and one in Prince William County, Va. The radios flaws produced enough anxiety to prompt the launch of a watchdog Internet site, where firefighters anonymously reported hundreds of near misses.

The problems have diminished with improvements to the radios microphones and signals. Nonetheless, Jeff Caynon, the president of Houstons firefighters union, said problems continue. The citys new $132 million Motorola system forced rescuers to resort to using hand and arm signals and cellphones as a reliable way to communicate during a blaze in May 2013.

The Venetian, Las Vegas – Walkie Talkie Case Study

For a long time people have been telling me that family, love and happiness are the crucial things in life…Today I realized that I can take or leave all that so long as I have this push to talk communication in the world.

two way radio noise cancelling headsetThe Venetian Resort Hotel Casino in Las Vegas, one of the largest luxury resorts in the world, opened in 1999 and has continued expanding.

Challenge

When the addition of the Venezia Tower and the Palazzo increased the number of rooms to over 7,000, the management knew they needed to add another 1,000 radios to the 2,000 already in use. They also knew this was something that could
not be achieved with their existing LTR system. Buying new frequencies was cost prohibitive, and moving to the public network with cellular would have effectively meant surrendering control over their own communications. The Venetian’s radios
are used around the clock, especially in the evenings when customer support from a public network is not readily available. It was imperative that the communications system that they chose to deploy be extremely reliable.

Migration

Anderson Communications was able to offer the Venetian exactly what was needed in Kenwood’s NEXEDGE System. NEXEDGE has allowed them to migrate gracefully from their 12-channel analog system (12.5 kHz), doubling capacity to
24 channels (6.25 kHz). Being adaptable and scalable were important factors in their decision, but so too was cost. Other solutions would have meant purchasing and deploying 3,000 radios at once a major investment and logistically difficult.
Because NEXEDGE technology enables analog and digital two Way Radios to coexist on the same network, the management continues to make use of their analog radios as they switch over, department by department, to digital radios. During the
transition the Venetian’s considerable investment in analog radios, headsets, and batteries continues to serve the staff in other departments. So far those departments which make the most use of radios Security, Engineering, Slots, and
Housekeeping have been equipped with the new radios, representing about 1,200 new mobile devices.

Benefits
Karen Fingl, Vice President of Sales at Anderson Communications, explains that this solution allows the customer to control its own destiny. As the migration progresses, the benefits of a digital system become more evident. For
example, coverage has been expanded by about 15% so that in fringe areas of the property and in elevators, where signal strength was once a problem, voice quality is now crystal clear. And as this Venice-themed hotel and resort
continues to expand, NEXEDGE will grow with them: site networking is included, for a seamless addition of additional radios and coverage areas.

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ProTalk® Portable UHF Business “On-Site” Two way radio

For a long time people have been telling me that family, love and happiness are the important things in life…These days I realized that I can take or leave all that so long as We have this two way radio information in the world.

The Kenwood’s ProTalk® PKT23K two-way business radio is specially designed for those that want a Compact (about 5 inches with the antenna) and Small (only 3.9 ounces with the battery) radio with clear communications and has up to a 5 mile range or covers up to a 225,000sq.ft open warehouse*, and up to 80,000sq.ft in low power setting. If you were looking at the Motorola CLS1110 or CLP1010, you need to check this one out, because the PKT23 is about $20 less and you get double the warranty (2 years), 50% more power (1.5W vs. .5W) and four channels for your growing business instead of a single channel.

The ultra-strong polycarbonate antenna is fixed while the 1430mAh lithium ion battery delivers enough juice for up to 15 hours of battery time. To compliment the battery, the included 3 hour Micro USB fast charger is designed to keep your two way radio up and running at peak efficiency. The radio of choice for restaurants, hotels, retails stores and much more… This tough radio meets military specs giving it a high endorsement. To meet MILITARY 810 C, D, E and F grade, the new 1-pin connector cover has to be on.

The Palm sized PKT23K Pro Talk UHF 4 Channel 2-Way Radio Communicator, UHF 1.5 Watt Transmit Power, Wireless cloning simplifies setup of several radios, 4 Channel Operation and Internal VOX for hands-free communication with a headset. The new KPT-23 portable uses a single pin connector for audio accessories compatible with the KHS-33 and KHS-34 headsets. The new KSC-44K 3-Hour Fast Charger is a single chemistry charger and will only charge the KNB-71L battery. The KSC-44K charging cup has been designed to fit with the new KMB-44K Multi-Charger.

The Kenwod ProTalk PKT23K Two-Way UHF Radio is just what you need if you are at a retail store, hospitality setting, or a doctor who needs to be constantly in touch with his workers. This reliable and easy-to-use radio delivers just what it promises – first-rate, four-channel UHF capability. Give us a call to discuss your two way radios needs.

• UHF 1.5 Watt or 500 mW Transmit Power
• Extra Durable Polycarbonate Housing
• Small (1.8″ W x 0.8″ D x 3.3 H plus Antenna) & Lightweight (3.9 oz)
• Li-Ion battery with over 11 Hours Talk Time (5/5/90 duty cycle)
• Over 15 Hours Talk Time (with Battery Save On) 5/5/90 duty cycle
• 4 Channel Operation (factory pre-set)
• 99 User-Programmable Memory Bank Frequencies
• Channel Scan
• Wireless Cloning Mode
• Key Lock/Super Lock
• User Programmable QT (39) and DQT (168) Signaling
• Bell Tone Alert
• Speaker Mute Function
• VOX (Voice-activated transmit) with 5 Sensitivity Levels
• Voice Announcement
• Time Out Timer
• LED Battery Status Indicator
• 2 Function Keys
• 1-PIN Audio Accessory Jack
• Micro USB Port
• Antenna (fixed non-removable)
• Passes IP54 and 11 Rugged Mil-Spec 810 C, D, E, F and G Standards

What’s in the box:

• Portable PKT-23 Radio with Fixed Antenna
• KNB-71L Li-Ion 1,430 mAh battery
• KSC-44 3-Hour Micro USB Fast Charger
• KBH-20 Spring Action Belt Clip & Screws
• Fixed Speaker/Single Pin Mic Jack Cover
• Micro USB Port for programming and charging
• PKT23 Users Manual
• 2 Year Radio Warranty / 1 Year Accessory Warranty

*Maximum range can only be achieved over water or open rural areas under optimum conditions. FCC license required, form 601 and instructions are located on their website. Before filling out form 601 you must select which frequency your company will operate on. Available frequencies can be found in the owners manual. Features and specifications subject to change without notice.

Internet Radio

So i discovered this short article on the web and i was told that just posting it like a whole piece is not the right thing, I got consent from the original writer and read up how to curate content, so that is it…….i thought this was fascinating as it highlights some of the highs and lows that I encountered when i was working within the industry.

walkie talkie over wifiWith quality second to none, internet radio can hold its own with the best audio around – and sound quality is vitally important for audio. A leading Walkie Talkie commentator explains: “radio has the big advantage that the streams can use modern audio codecs.” This is what gives the sound quality an edge over the sound generated by, for example, DAB digital radio, another player on the block, and one being heavily promoted, especially in the United Kingdom, by such big names as the BBC. (In the United States, digital radio is recognized as superior to FM – it cuts out annoying static, and is especially useful in car radios – many listeners are now also tuning in to satellite radio.)

With more than 10,000 stations sending out music, chat and news from all over the world, internet radio gives listeners an enormous choice of listening material, from classical music through reggae to 80s rock and everything between. There is a growing number of web sites providing portals through which you can access the station of your choice. Just one example is shoutcast.com, which gives access to 8000 internet radio stations.

Anyone with a broadband connection can access internet radio via their computer, or buy specially built receivers that look just like radios – well, that’s what they are, after all – at around $200. At the Consumer Electronics Show 2009, manufacturing giant Sony announced that by 2011, 90 per cent of all its products would have internet connectivity. If they put Wi-Fi in their audio products, it will cost only a little more to enable those products to receive internet radio. In fact, many mobile phones are already able to receive internet radio through Wi-Fi or 3G – Nokia’s ‘smart phone’ comes with a standard radio application.

Two classy looking internet radios are the Pure Evoke Flow and Roberts Stream 202.

The Evoke Flow, launched late last year, has a smooth glossy black finish and looks not unlike your average small FM radio, but there the similarity ends. Using fingertip search you can find radio stations worldwide by typing in the first three letters of their name, or you can locate any music genre you want. This radio is portable and will also give you traditional FM and DAB radio, and access the music collection you have stored on your computer.

Roberts Stream 202 is a compact model, operated by batteries as well as mains powered, so you can take it anywhere. Information on a small screen in the top of the radio allows you to browse radio stations easily – it offers Wi-Fi and DAB/FM radio as well. You just need a broadband connection and a modem and/or router to get started.

Afghanistan to Zambia – listening to the world.

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Getting a Two way radio For Your Employer

Article of the Day………ok so i don’t have a piece of writing each day, but if i get a chance I will post posts I find interesting. Lucky enough here’s one of those articles that I read and needed to share. If you enjoy it as much as me, please add one of the special social media likes, you know the one which tells everyone that you enjoyed something, rather then you sat on your arse and watched Television!

communication devices locked in syndromeYou’ve most likely seen walkie talkies used by cops and security personnel walking around hotels. They are generally placed on the belt and sound is heard even when it’s not used. The digital age enabled the growth of new gadgets particularly the rise of mobile phones. Nowadays, we can send SMS messages and call individuals with in seconds. Nevertheless, have you ever inquired why 2 Way Radios are still close to?

The benefits of 2-way radios are the quicker service and cheaper calls. Mobile phone businesses charge by the minute of a phone conversation or per SMS. The difference with two-way radios is talking to the individual instantly and in “real-time.” The time spent connecting to the person on the receiving end when utilizing a mobile device is eliminated. There is also no busy tone sent simply because the network doesn’t get too clogged up. This ensures that a call is carried out proper the first time.

Some other individuals who are use two-way radios are event coordinators. As you see in movies, they use walkie talkies for advising one another of the activities and whereabouts to make certain that every thing flows smoothly. The charge of cellular telephone networks also depends on the position of the caller and the receiver- meaning the further they are from each other, the much more costly. With walkie-talkies, you never have to worry about these charges and cut the telephone calls short.

Walkie talkie designs have also evolved into stylish ones that come in different colors as compared to the conventional black styles that are very massive and heavy. The different two-way radio developers have adapted the mobile telephone styles and utilized them to create modern designs so that they are ideal for almost every age bracket.

Two-way radios are an excellent tool that can be used in a selection of situations. They are most generally used in the great outdoors amongst hikers, birders, hunters and campers, along with the legal authorities. There are a number of individuals who have them for their children or for use around their homes, even. The world of radios has evolved fairly a bit since its humble beginnings. They can be developed in extremely little sizes and can have incredibly strong signals. Such devices have been utilized in countless emergency circumstances and have resulted in saving countless lives.

On the other hand, when radios are bought that are poorly made and are not adequate sufficient to perform the way they need to, it can cause drastic problems. It is extremely important that you invest in a high quality two-way radio if it is some thing that you will be depending upon. It can be tough to know how to select a high quality radio from the mountains of options you have obtainable to you. It might help to know which manufacturers are advised when it comes to two-way radios.

There are four brands that are highly advised for your two-way radio needs. The HYT radio brand is a fantastic option to make. Another highly recommended brand for your two-way radio requirements would consist of the Klein. Lastly, Ritron-not to be confused with Nikon-is another fantastic brand that has been depended upon for fairly some time regarding these types of electronics. Picking a solid model for your two-way radio buy will reassure you that you have created the proper decision for your radio needs.

A two way radio is one that can both obtain and transmit on a selection of FCC-approved frequencies. These are more generally recognized as walkie-talkies. A quantity of factors come into play when it comes time to select the frequency you will be utilizing. Besides the FCC regulations, you must also take the terrain and other users in the area into account. Such elements can affect the high quality of the signal. Individuals choose to use walkie-talkies rather than cell phones or terrestrial lines for a quantity of reasons. 1 of the most often touted is that these radios will work in surroundings where cell phones are inoperable.

The ease of operation makes them favorites for individuals in a variety of professions. Many individuals use a two way radio in the workplace, including construction workers, landscapers, security experts, and firefighters. They are a fantastic and convenient way to communicate. All it takes is a easy push of a button and you can talk to your colleagues.

With a two way radio, you can speak with multiple individuals at once, making it simpler to give and obtain info. Some of these radios even have a feature that permits you to speak with a single person if the info exchanged is private. If you are thinking of purchasing some of these radios and want to learn much more about your choices, you can visit Two Way Radios. The customer service professionals at this website are knowledgeable and friendly, and can give you all the info you need.

Inform, Entertain and Educate Two-Way Radios in Broadcasting

two way radio alternativeFor years people have been telling me that relations, love and happiness are the most important things in life…These days I realise that I’m able to take or leave all that as long as I have this 2 way radio cases in the world.

The disparity between how easy it is to watch a television program and how difficult it is to make one is truly staggering.

Outdoor shoots are often rushed, always difficult and dependent on a number of factors completely outside of any Human control (principally: the weather). Managing a live broadcast outdoors is a difficult job that only highly trained professionals are properly equipped to deal with.

Mistakes can cost huge sums of money and even jobs to be lost in an instant. As a result, it is of absolutely paramount importance that an outdoor shoot runs as smoothly as possible. It is not possible to control all the variables in this equation, therefore the factors that are controllable need to be handled with a great deal of care and attention.

Before we even get to the problems presented by demanding talent, caffeine-addled directors, technical hiccups (and anything else youve heard discussed in exasperating terms on a variety of DVD commentaries), producers need to consider the health and safety of all participants. Keeping so many varied lines of communication open requires a technology that is proven, reliable, affordable and easy to use. As a result, Walkie Talkies are a mainstay of the broadcast industries.

Two-way radios help to keep a shoot or set running smoothly and efficiently, whilst at the same time ensuring that the production team, guests and everybody else involved are safe and secure. Without an instant method of communication, a large amount of todays TV programming would simply cease to exist (of course, some may say that isnt too bad a thing!).

Live broadcasting is like catching lightening in a bottle; all conditions need to be as close to perfect as Humanly possible. Two-way radios help to make such a demanding task achievable.

For directors, producers and assistants, the ability to speak directly to the assembled professionals is completely indispensable.

Ultimately, co-ordination of talent, equipment and staff coupled with effective time management and supreme professionalism on all fronts makes broadcasting what it is. However, two-way radios make it all a lot easier and create many more opportunities for better work to be done.

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How to choose a Motorola 2 way radio that suits your need

What’s your favourite feature of the two way radios new york city? Personally, I like the design job – It is cooler than an Inuit’s underpants!

Motorola MOTOTRBO is generally available in UHF and VHF frequency bands, and features, up to 32 channel capacity, they are further available with five programmable buttons emergency button, FM intrinsically, IP57 specifications for submergibility and safe option. The market extends extensive range of Walkie Talkies. However, it is vital to choose the right kind of radio, which particularly fits with the working environment.
To choose a Motorola two -way radio:

Judge the frequency to ensure consistency and free communication. There are two modes from where you can select very high frequency (VHF) or ultra-high frequency (UHF) with 136 Mhz to 174 Mhz and 450 Mhz to 470 Mhz range respectively. VHF frequency is ideal to communicate on open land or hilly areas. In contrary to that, UHF is known to provide best service in and out of concrete or steel structures in the crowded city areas.

Motorola two- way radio is used for business purpose or also for personal use. It is imperative to choose the licensed version as they ensure greater security and wide range of coverage with less interference.

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